Want the Job? Let Them Know By Sending Prompt Follow-up Notes

In my classes, I used to recommend hand-written notes following job interviews. But I gave up on that idea when a student asked me where she could buy a stamp. I realized I was clinging to my “old school” ways.

Now, I just insist on any form of follow-up. And sooner the better.

While studies show that 91% of prospective employers appreciate receiving interview follow-up thank-you notes, only 43% of candidates actually send them.

Since a prompt response can differentiate you from others who fail to do so, I recently gave up on my hand-written preference in favor of a well-written email.

Whenever I discuss this topic, I admit to being blown away by one memorable applicant who I interviewed during my time at Ketchum. Maureen Ray sat in the agency’s lobby and wrote five separate thank-you notes to each person that interviewed her. The impressed receptionist personally handed the envelopes to the interviewers, adding her personal endorsement: “You’ll want to hire this one.” Maureen landed that job the very next day.

Follow-up emails are easier than many fear. Just follow the seven tips in this infographic provided by AngelList, a job board for startup and tech jobs. The AngelList blog also provides six templates for memorable follow-up emails.

 

One thought on “Want the Job? Let Them Know By Sending Prompt Follow-up Notes

  1. This post and its emphasis on follow-up is so important for those not just in the PR field, but for everyone. I find this to also be applicable for students and their teachers as well. Sending thank-you notes is a great way to show someone that you appreciate their time. It was interesting reading about Maureen Ray, and I believe this is a point that will stick with me as I advance in the PR world. A follow-up can be what makes you stand out compared to others who might be applying for the same job, and in Maureen’s case, this allowed for her success.

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